Energy Work and Coaching Discount!

“For a star to be born, there is one thing that must happen: a nebula must collapse.

So collapse.
Crumble.
This is not your destruction.

This is your birth.”

….And this is as it should be. It is time to let go and release, so we may look inward, shine outward, and move onward, forward, and upward, in 2017 with clear minds and open hearts.

…Join me this month at Sojourn Studio  and collectively, we will burn brightly in the final moments of 2016 and welcome the coming miracles of 2017.

…If you are looking for additional guidance and insight as you approach the New Year, consider energy work and coaching sessions.

All energy work and coaching sessions booked during the month of January will receive a 10% discount.

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Keep the Change

So many of us value change and progression, yet we struggle to achieve the goals that we set for ourselves. Why is that? Why is it so hard to make personal changes, particularly when they are important, meaningful, and beneficial? What is so hard about doing what is best for us and achieving what we really want?

In truth, I think that the answers to questions such as these are quite complex, yet simplistic at the very same time. Change is hard. It takes commitment, perseverance, and even courage. Taking matters of life into our own hands involves responsibility, accountability, and the overcoming of obstacles that we would rather not face. Additionally, as we make lasting changes in our lives, we may be put in a position that requires the help of others. We may encounter uncertainty. And we may have to rely on new processes such as insight, self-awareness, and discovery rather than older processes that we were once so comfortable with.

Simply said, change can be hard. Change can be scary. Change can be confusing. And sometimes, change is none of these things and it is unexpected or unintentional. It might even be exciting, or simply the result of something natural or evolutionary. Regardless of what change feels like, though, it is quite often necessary. It is necessary in life because change leads to progression. To growth. To the betterment of one’s self and one’s life.

As most of us well know, the journey online casino of life does not happen in our comfort zone. There are times in our lives that we must venture out to unknown territory and test our limits. There are times in our lives that we must be a bit uncomfortable. That we must do something a bit differently and make a change that is important, meaningful, and for the better in the long run. This is important, no matter how comfortable or uncomfortable, for it is during these times that we learn what we are made of, discovering who we really are, what we really want in life, and what incredible feats we are really capable of.

Venture out of your comfort zone and into new territory. Challenge yourself, and attempt to do something differently. And remember that most of the beautiful rewards in life would never had been achieved had a change not been made.

Redefine Struggle

My sister recently sent me an article entitled, “Struggle for Smarts”. The author opened his article with a story about a fourth grade classroom in Japan. In this story, the teacher was teaching his class how to draw three-dimensional cubes. As he observed the class, the author noticed that one of the boys was struggling with the concept and appeared unable to draw the cube correctly. The teacher noticed this as well and invited the youngster to draw the cube on the board in front of the class. Doing as he was instructed, the boy went to the front of the class, and drew the cube to the best of his ability, but he still could not complete the cube correctly. After his first try, the teacher asked the class, “How does that look?” The class confirmed that it was drawn incorrectly, so he tried again. Every few minutes, the teacher would ask the class if he had gotten it right, and each time, the students would look up from their work and shake their heads “no”. As the hour went on, and the boy had still not completed the cube correctly, the author realized that he had begun to perspire as he watched the boy anxiously and worried that he would become discouraged and begin to cry.

But, to his surprise, he did not. He diligently persisted, drawing his cube incorrectly each time. Try after try, he continued to draw his cube until, he had gotten it right. And when he had finally drawn the cube with mastery, the class broke into applause and he was able to return to his seat with pride.

Like the author of this article, many of us become uncomfortable when we imagine this young boy struggling in front of his peers in such a way. We think, “Why would the teacher do that to him, knowing that he was unable to draw the cube correctly? That poor boy! I feel so badly for him!” Yet, while this boy was struggling to master the task of drawing the cube, it does not appear that he was struggling emotionally. So why is it that we assume that he was? And why is it that we ourselves shift uncomfortably and feel badly for this boy who struggled to learn something new? It seems that many of us tend to view struggle as an indicator that we, or someone else, is lacking or “less than” in some important way. That we are not as intelligent, not as capable, not as resilient as we “should be”. That because we do not have it figured out yet, we are missing a skill or trait that we should otherwise possess.

Yet, if we were to adopt a perspective that is similar to the Japanese classroom, we would realize that struggle is an inherent and predictable part of life. It is part of learning, part of mastering a skill, part of figuring things out and finding our way. As this classroom knows, to struggle is not a sign of weakness. Rather, to struggle is to be presented with yet another opportunity to overcome challenge and to learn. To struggle is an opportunity to be proud of ourselves and satisfied with our efforts as we work through something difficult and overcome an obstacle.